Beginning Training Series: Setting Goals and Making Them Happen

Today I will be discussing setting goals and how to achieve them as part of my series on beginning training.

Setting Goals

Possibly the most important thing to be thinking about when you are trying to begin your training is to make sure you have clear goals set. Not setting goals is one of the worst things you can do. With no clear target, your training will be aimless and eventually will fall into the background. Face it, we all live very busy lives, and one of the first things to get sacrificed is our training time.

Here are some things to think about when setting goals:

Limit the total number of goals:

Having 20 goals means you probably won’t achieve most of them. The more goals you have, the more divided your time will be. Keep the number down somewhere between three and seven, and focus on those.

Prioritize your goals:

If you have a lot of goals, there will be times you’ll have to sacrifice some of them due to limited time. Make sure you have an idea which ones are more important to you.

Make them attainable:

I can set a goal to be able to do one million pullups and be able to hit a quarter from 200 yards one handed with a pocket pistol. This doesn’t mean I have any chance of succeeding. Pick goals and limit them in scope to what you can achieve. When you get there you can always set a new goal. Make sure your deadlines are realistic as well.

Use measurable goals:

Not all goals are created equal. A measurable goal will always be better than an unmeasurable one. What I mean by this is that if you have no way to measure your progress against a goal, then you are wasting your time. Rather than set a goal to ‘shoot faster’ I would set a goal like shooting a clean FAST in under 5 seconds.

Set a due date:

Goals without a due date tend not to be met. If you don’t have that deadline you won’t maximize your effort to get it done. A good way to keep motivated is to set intermediate deadlines and goals that help you achieve the big one. Try not to have more than a few months to your next deadline.

Attaining your goals

Once you have set your goals, you need to make sure you have a plan to get there. Can I really expect to achieve my goals if I set them and forget them? A good way to make sure you succeed is by using a training journal. Write down your goals and track your progress. If improving your shooting is part of your goal, keep track of not only your scores and times, but where your shots hit the target. You never know when looking at months of shooting history might lead to an epiphany or help you diagnose a hardware problem.

 The most important part of reaching your goals is to map each goal to a training activity or activities. If I want to get stronger, then I should be planning on setting aside time to strength train. If I want to speed up my draw-stroke, I need to plan on spending time training that. It isn’t rocket science, but it is easy to forget that you need to set up a program based on what you want to achieve.

 Now that you know what you need to do and what your priorities are, it is time to start setting up that program.

 Creating a program

 If you have a tight schedule, this may be more difficult. If your schedule is consistent, grab your calendar when you sit down to do this. You need to break out different blocks of time, and make sure each of the activities you selected for reaching your goals is fit into each one. You can make Mondays and Wednesdays gym days and Tuesdays and Thursdays combatives days with the weekend dedicated to shooting for example. This all comes down to you, what you are trying to achieve, and when you have time to do it.

 If your schedule isn’t as predictable, you might consider determining what the blocks are without scheduling them. You can then rotate which block you do whenever you have some time. Here is where you priorities come into play. If you cannot always do everything, start at the beginning of your list again every week. Make sure your higher priority activities are at the beginning of the list, and you should always be able to make time for your highest priority.

 Tracking results

 The second half of making sure that you achieve your goals is logging your progress. The key benefit to keeping the training journal is that you can see progress. Progress is a great motivator. However, don’t be discouraged if progress is slow. Never use your journal as an excuse to change your training plans every day. Give yourself a good several weeks to several months to decide if something is or isn’t working for you.

Everything in your training ultimately begins and ends with goals. First, you select them. Second, you determine the best way to achieve them. Next, you work towards achieving them. And finally you measure your success.

 What are your goals for your training in 2012? Please post a comment and share them.

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