Archives for July 2012

Do you make the mistake of relying on one gun?

Equipment fails. Usually at the worst conceivable moment as evidenced by the fact that I’m writing this from my wife’s laptop. Mine kicked the bucket.

Convenient.

I wish my laptop was the only thing that failed me recently. Almost two months ago I wrote about how to prepare for a carbine course. I was preparing for a course I took a little over a week ago, a combined pistol/carbine class taught by Larry Vickers.

As part of my own preparation I had been familiarizing myself with my go-to rifle; making sure I had it zeroed and could make good hits quickly with my new Aimpoint Pro. Everything was working well; when I did my part I was shooting ragged holes at 25meters.

And then something happened.

A little heat and my rifle suddenly opened up to 8.5×11 size groups.

It definitely was the rifle. More specifically, it seems that it was the barrel. I removed the barrel and shipped it back to the manufacturer, CMMG. Long story short, the barrel was bad and produced poor groups for them as well. They ended up shipping me a complete upper to replace it. CMMG definitely stands behind their products.

In the meantime, being very short on time, I ordered a brand new Daniel Defense barrel. The barrel came in with a week to go before the class, as did the new Troy MRF-DI Battle Rail I ordered. Unfortunately I could not install the rail on the rifle. After spending a huge amount of time on the phone with both Daniel Defense and Troy it appears that the rail was out of spec.

As a result I had to overnight some plastic handguards to be up and running in time for the class, and took some time off work mid-week to zero and verify function of my rifle before the class. Everything worked fine and thankfully I got through the class without a hiccup.

What can we learn from my month of equipment failures?

I certainly learned a few lessons, the most important being that one is none. Backups are a good thing. If I had another rifle in a workable configuration I would have been good to go without the last minute parts shuffle. Don’t rely on one piece of equipment if you can avoid it.

The next most important lesson is avoid buying parts for a rifle under a time crunch. No one local ever seems to stock what you need, and most online distributors are out of stock on 50% of their merchandise at any given moment. If you need to build or buy a rifle for a class, make sure you do it months ahead of time. Invariably something will go wrong and you’ll need the time to sort it out. If you’re luckier than I am, you don’t have anything to lose by gearing up early.

5 Ways to Stay Motivated

Photo Credit: Jeremy Botter

What is the hardest part of training? I adamantly believe that it is staying motivated. Practicing and learning are relatively easy, but convincing yourself day after day to keep training, to do one more rep and push yourself a little further can be hard to do.

How many times have you started getting ready to go to the gym and decided not to? Or found some sort of excuse why you couldn’t dry fire today? Excuses are easy to find, especially when motivation is at its lowest.

I don’t have all the answers and can fall into many of these traps myself, but here are some tricks that have helped me to keep motivated and trudging on.

Find ways to make measurable progress (if only small)

Progress is the best motivator in the world. If you are able to do 10 pushups today and 11 pushups tomorrow, you have evidence that you are making progress. When you see progress you see the fruits of your labor and it makes any of the pain and suffering worth it.

When you lose sight of progress, or it becomes too small to measure day to day or week to week, you are destined to lose motivation. When you aren’t succeeding every day why keep going?

The best way to keep motivated is to keep making progress.

If you are working on a skill or exercise that requires significant time and dedication to reach the next milestone, this can be difficult to see. Make your progress more obvious by finding intermediate milestones.

Maybe this means adding smaller amounts of weight to a weight routine, adding repetitions or even decreasing the length of time for your workout. With shooting skills, finding measurable progress might require you to start using calipers to measure your groups or investing in a shot timer.

If you see progress you will be less likely to tell yourself to skip training.

Set achievable goals

Connected to the idea of measurable progress is achievable goals. You may have big goals set that are very difficult to achieve. Rather than struggle for potentially years to achieve these goals, set some intermediate goals that you know you can achieve.

If you set a goal to become rated Master in IDPA for example, perhaps setting your sights on Expert or Sharpshooter are more easily attainable for you. Strive for the reachable goals so you get an opportunity to pat yourself on the back for achieving your goal.

Leave yourself reminders

Sometimes motivation is about remembering why you want to train. Or even that you should train.

A great way to stay motivated is to find ways not to forget the reasons you want to train. Place a sticky note on your bathroom mirror. Maybe all it says is go train. Or it could have your goals written on it. Either way, seeing your goals every day should inspire you to keep training, even when you don’t feel like it.

Train with others

Another method for staying motivated is to train with others. When you are weak, your friends will pick you back up. When you are strong you pick your friends back up.

Even better is the desire not to show weakness in front of your friends. We all perform better with an audience if for no other reason than we are a competitive species. You want to avoid losing motivation? Form a training group.

Don’t allow yourself to give up

Tricks can help you to stay motivated, but sometimes it is just about willpower. Work on building the mindset to keep training and not to give in to the temptation of quitting or taking it easy. Treat the desire to quit as the inspiration not to.

You want to quit, therefore you can’t.

It should be your goal to build that never quitting attitude required to succeed (and reach your other goals).

Motivation is difficult to find at times. You might have had a rough day at work, or you might be tired or sore from another training session. You might feel a little sick or have allergies, or maybe the AC is broken.

At times like these, tell yourself to suck it up and get back to training. Use the tricks if you need them and tell yourself not to give in.

Warning: Failure Does Happen

Photo Credit: Charles & Clint

One principle I have based my training on is that our failure is defined by our training as much as our success is. Mistakes are to be expected because no matter how much we train, perfection is unattainable. The best we can hope for is to make fewer mistakes. When these mistakes do happen, it is our training that defines how we will react to these failures. If you never practice, your default reaction will be a surprise. But when you train hard and consistently, you can expect to look no worse than your worst day in training if you need to defend yourself. The more you practice, the better your ‘worst’ becomes.

Before I went on vacation I shot my second IDPA match. I did pretty well in this match, but I made some major mistakes. While some of the mistakes themselves are pretty disheartening, I also learned something about my training. After dropping a magazine on two separate stages during a reload, I managed to recover quite well.

My favorite mistake was on a stage that involved a vehicle. You started in the car, picked up the loaded pistol on the passenger seat and engaged a target out the passenger side window until slide lock (4 rounds), debussed out the driver side and were to engage targets across the hood from next to the driver side door.

During this reload is when I dropped the mag. I didn’t just drop the mag though… I filled it with sand and stuck it into my pistol. The pistol failed to go into battery and I now had a fight on my hands. Tap rack and bang didn’t solve it, so I ended up removing the magazine and clearing the pistol out completely.

It sucked. A lot.

I’m not proud of dropping that magazine. I am proud of how I dealt with the issue. I didn’t lose my cool, and I just worked through the problem. Amazingly I didn’t come in last place on the stage and got plenty of compliments on how I dealt with it. I now have a good idea of what my ‘worst’ performance might look like, and it doesn’t bother me too much.

In training: always work through it

There are two lessons to be learned here. One is to not drop your magazine in the dirt. The other more important lesson is to always work through it. If you dry fire and manage to foul a reload or a draw, don’t stop until you are done.

Even if it’s not quick and clean, the important thing is completing the task you started.

Your natural response should be to deal with the problem, not run away from it. While we strive for perfect practice, we must also realize that in real life you don’t get do overs. If you make a mistake, make it right.

In pressure testing: don’t lose your cool and always work through it

When you get to a match or you are working on some evolution intended to pressure test your skills, work through your mistakes. This should be pretty obvious (and second nature if you practice this way) but it needs to be said.

When bad stuff happens to you or you make a mistake, stay calm and fix the problem. Redo’s don’t happen in real life so why should they happen in your training?

In real life: work through it

It should be even harder to screw this up in real life with a full adrenaline dump. Just like in training and testing: when you make a mistake work through it. Don’t stop to scold yourself or waste time swearing under your breath or hating yourself.

Fix the problem! Fix it now!

The costs of not working though a problem in practice are low at face value, but when it causes you to not react the way you want on the street, the cost is high. Again, real life has no redo’s and your attacker won’t reset if you ask him to when you make a mistake.

My point is redundant just like your training should be. Hopefully you make fewer mistakes as you train more, but when you do make them, make them good mistakes. Fix the problem and get it done. Don’t immediately stop and restart in an attempt to avoid making the mistake in the first place. That’s for after you fix it.

Unless you make the mistake more than you do it right, you need to work through it so you will have the confidence you can work through similar mistakes in a life or death situation. You need your default reaction to be a good one when it really counts.

Have you ever made a mistake in competition or training? How did you deal with it? Post a comment below and share!

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