Warning: Failure Does Happen

Photo Credit: Charles & Clint

One principle I have based my training on is that our failure is defined by our training as much as our success is. Mistakes are to be expected because no matter how much we train, perfection is unattainable. The best we can hope for is to make fewer mistakes. When these mistakes do happen, it is our training that defines how we will react to these failures. If you never practice, your default reaction will be a surprise. But when you train hard and consistently, you can expect to look no worse than your worst day in training if you need to defend yourself. The more you practice, the better your ‘worst’ becomes.

Before I went on vacation I shot my second IDPA match. I did pretty well in this match, but I made some major mistakes. While some of the mistakes themselves are pretty disheartening, I also learned something about my training. After dropping a magazine on two separate stages during a reload, I managed to recover quite well.

My favorite mistake was on a stage that involved a vehicle. You started in the car, picked up the loaded pistol on the passenger seat and engaged a target out the passenger side window until slide lock (4 rounds), debussed out the driver side and were to engage targets across the hood from next to the driver side door.

During this reload is when I dropped the mag. I didn’t just drop the mag though… I filled it with sand and stuck it into my pistol. The pistol failed to go into battery and I now had a fight on my hands. Tap rack and bang didn’t solve it, so I ended up removing the magazine and clearing the pistol out completely.

It sucked. A lot.

I’m not proud of dropping that magazine. I am proud of how I dealt with the issue. I didn’t lose my cool, and I just worked through the problem. Amazingly I didn’t come in last place on the stage and got plenty of compliments on how I dealt with it. I now have a good idea of what my ‘worst’ performance might look like, and it doesn’t bother me too much.

In training: always work through it

There are two lessons to be learned here. One is to not drop your magazine in the dirt. The other more important lesson is to always work through it. If you dry fire and manage to foul a reload or a draw, don’t stop until you are done.

Even if it’s not quick and clean, the important thing is completing the task you started.

Your natural response should be to deal with the problem, not run away from it. While we strive for perfect practice, we must also realize that in real life you don’t get do overs. If you make a mistake, make it right.

In pressure testing: don’t lose your cool and always work through it

When you get to a match or you are working on some evolution intended to pressure test your skills, work through your mistakes. This should be pretty obvious (and second nature if you practice this way) but it needs to be said.

When bad stuff happens to you or you make a mistake, stay calm and fix the problem. Redo’s don’t happen in real life so why should they happen in your training?

In real life: work through it

It should be even harder to screw this up in real life with a full adrenaline dump. Just like in training and testing: when you make a mistake work through it. Don’t stop to scold yourself or waste time swearing under your breath or hating yourself.

Fix the problem! Fix it now!

The costs of not working though a problem in practice are low at face value, but when it causes you to not react the way you want on the street, the cost is high. Again, real life has no redo’s and your attacker won’t reset if you ask him to when you make a mistake.

My point is redundant just like your training should be. Hopefully you make fewer mistakes as you train more, but when you do make them, make them good mistakes. Fix the problem and get it done. Don’t immediately stop and restart in an attempt to avoid making the mistake in the first place. That’s for after you fix it.

Unless you make the mistake more than you do it right, you need to work through it so you will have the confidence you can work through similar mistakes in a life or death situation. You need your default reaction to be a good one when it really counts.

Have you ever made a mistake in competition or training? How did you deal with it? Post a comment below and share!

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