3 Steps To Make Your Training Work With a Volatile Schedule

Photo Credit: fabiennew

My schedule is almost always jam packed. Between the ”day job,” running my new dojo, serving on the BoD at my local fish and game club, and all of life’s other little surprises, there is almost always something I need to be doing.

Some of these demands on my time are constant. I know I’ll always be in the dojo certain nights and that most of the day I’ll be on site working for my clients. Working my training around these fixed obligations is relatively easy.

What’s more difficult is finding time when my schedule changes rapidly. A deadline approaches at work, an impromptu meeting, or maybe even just coming down with a cold all throw a wrench in the works. It’s dealing with an ever changing schedule that really makes consistent training hard.

Fitting your training in

In my situation I’m pretty much forced to find a way to make my training fit in around the rest of my life. I’ve found a few tricks that really help me, hopefully they can help you too.

Break your program into manageable chunks

If you have a tight schedule to work around, you should consider breaking your training program into smaller manageable chunks. Maybe 10 or 20 minutes each.

Breaking your program into small pieces provides two benefits: firstly, shorter sessions can easily be worked in and around your schedule. If your schedule changes, it is a lot easier to move a 20 minute workout around compared to a 2 hour mega workout.

You might even plan to do 3 of your mini sessions back to back under ideal circumstances – but when things change you can easily reorganize your schedule.

Organize your ‘chunks’ into your program

Once you have multiple sessions to draw from, you want to organize them to form a training program. For dry-fire training you might have 5 different dry-fire days, each of which consists of a different routine. Work your dry-fire days in order to ensure an appropriate balance regardless of whether you can do 10 sessions a week or 1.

Using multiple sessions like this means that when something unexpected comes up, it doesn’t destroy your program.

Pick optimal training days and times

My dry-fire days are usually Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, since those are the days I’m free of most of my evening obligations. As a result I tend to tentatively plan on working my dry-fire sessions in on those days. By keeping these evenings open for dry-fire I force myself to make a consistent effort to work on my goals. Don’t just assume that once you have broken your program into smaller chunks you will train when it strikes you as convenient. You still need a plan, but being flexible with that plan will help you stay on track.

This is how I work around my volatile schedule. Do you have a crazy work or travel schedule to work around? How do you handle it? Do me a favor and post a comment to share your strategies.

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