Best of the Web 5/18/12

Another week, and some more great posts.  Here are my favorites from the past 7 days.

Mental Performance Blocks (gunnuts.net) – Caleb discusses a topic very near and dear to my heart.  I think most of the time that I perform poorly it has more to do with overconfidence or psyching myself out than a lack of skills.

Don’t Shoot .357 (thetruthaboutguns.com) – Have I mentioned that I don’t think revolvers are a very good defensive weapon?  Sure they can be good in the right hands, but here is yet another reason why you should just ignore the revolver when selecting a defensive weapon.  Many extol the virtues and the power of .357, but it comes down to being a difficult round to shoot.  If you are going to bring a revolver to the fight, at least use .38 special.

Training with a DA trigger (gunnuts.net) – A second good posts from Caleb this week… this one is about the double action trigger.  There are a lot of beliefs out there that a double action/single action pistol makes training more difficult than with a gun that has a consistent trigger pull like a striker fired gun for example.  Caleb tries to debunk this myth.  While he makes some good points, I think most DA/SA guns have a DA trigger pull that borderlines on ridiculous, making DA/SA a liability when you need to hit quickly the first time.

 

 

Best of the Web 5/11/12

Another week, and some more great posts.  Here are my favorites from the past 7 days.

Priorities (pistol-training.com) – Todd touches on a point that I strongly agree with.  Performance is good, but reliability needs to be there as well.  I think this applies for both equipment and skills.  If your equipment provides superb performance when it works, but only works a small percentage of the time, was the tradeoff worth it?  Consistency and reliability are prerequisites to performance.

Will vs Skill (thetruthaboutguns.com) – Paul Markel wrote a great post for The Truth About Guns about mindset.  The short version is that the will to succeed is more valuable than skills that aren’t backed up by the right mindset.  I can’t agree more.  High stress, high pressure training techniques help push us so we can find those weak spots in both our training and our willpower.

 

Best of the Web 5/4/12

Another week, and some more great posts.  Here are my favorites from the past 7 days.

Training vs Experience (thetruthaboutguns.com) – The Truth About Guns republished an article from Active Response Training that points out that not all bad guys are untrained slackers; many in fact do have training on their side as well.  Even more thought-provoking, they ‘train’ in the environment in which they operate, not the square range like many of us.  To top it off, they have more experience as well.  Maybe our opponents are training harder than us after all.

Real World Usage of the EDC Trauma Kit by a First Responder (ITS Tactical) – One of ITS Tactical’s readers wrote a detailed account of his usage of his ITS Tactical EDC Trauma Kit in a real situation.  Immediately it points out how important it is to have some medical training (and carry the tools of the trade).  This story also shows that training scars can affect things outside of combatives.  Bottom line: if you carry any piece of medical gear with you, make sure you know how to use it.  Opening your tourniquet and looking at it for the first time while someone is bleeding to death might be too late.

Best of The Web 4/27/12

This week provided some excellent posts on training. Below I have rounded up some of my favorite blog posts from across the web over the past 7 days. Please feel free to email me if you have come across a great post that you would like to share.

Permission to Miss (pistol-training.com) – Todd at pistol-training.com makes some excellent points about working on improving speed. Sometimes when pushing your boundries you need to expect to miss now and again.

The scars of others should teach us caution (When The Balloon Goes Up) – WTBGU touches on a subject I feel very strongly about. Training scars – in other words bad habits that are created by the ways we train – have plenty of opportunities to form. Good training will mitigate the formation of these training scars.

Sandbags: Unconventional Tools for Functional Strength (ITS Tactical) – Jake Saenz wrote an excellent primer to training with sandbags. Functional strength is crucial to preparing for self-defense encounters (if you want to be well prepared that is). Sandbags provide dynamic resistance and get us out of the mechanical form of conventional exercises.

Best of The Web 4/20/12

Last week’s Best of the Web was well received, so I’m giving it another go. Below I have rounded up some of my favorite blog posts from across the web over the past 7 days. Not too many training related posts jumped out at me this week – in the future please feel free to email me if you have come across a great post that you would like to share.

Using competition to learn to develop a game plan (When The Balloon Goes Up) – WTBGU discusses using competition to develop problem solving skills. All self-defense scenarios ultimately are high-stakes puzzles. The ability to solve these puzzles under pressure is key to survival.

5 Important Skills for Protecting Yourself (Stuff From Hsoi) – Hsoi provides some great tips for preparing to keep yourself alive on the street. He points out how mindset trumps equipment when it comes to self-defense.

 

Best of The Web 4/13/12

I’m going to try something different this week. Below I have rounded up some of my favorite blog posts from across the web over the past 7 days. I’m considering making this a regular part of the blog, so let me know if you like the idea.

Speed vs. Accuracy (Gun Nuts Media) – Caleb discusses the balance of speed vs accuracy for competitive shooting. The same debate applies to defensive shooting, though the parameters do change slightly.

Learning vs Skill Building vs Maintenance (pistol-training.com) – Todd over at pistol-training.com wrote a great writeup comparing what I would call phases of training. He discusses the difference between learning new skills, working on improving and refining those skills, and working to maintain a current skill set.

Get her a revolver, it’s simple! (When The Balloon Goes Up) – You all know my own feelings on revolvers so it’s no surprise that I agree whole heartedly with this post. WTBGU dissects the revolver and shows not only why it isn’t a superior platform, but why the myth that a revolver makes a great gun for a woman is bunch of garbage.

 

WP Like Button Plugin by Free WordPress Templates