How Far Do You Take Your Training?

Picture by soldiersmediacenter

If you want to survive a life or death encounter with an assailant, you need to invest some time training. How far you take that training will depend on a variety of factors, but ultimately it is up to you. Everyone has different requirements for what their training must prepare them for. And we all have different amounts of time, resources, and even physical ability to train.

Here are some factors that impact those decisions.

Risk

When I discuss risk in reference to training I am describing the risk of a threat of physical harm to your person (or the persons you may protect). Obviously a soldier or police officer will encounter far more risk day in and day out than I will on my daily commute to and from work. As a result, if risk were to be the sole basis for deciding how far to take your training, then clearly our soldiers and police officers have a greater need to take their training to a higher level.

Time

Time is another factor that distinguishes how we must train. The busy individual who works late and has many activities on their plate might not have the time to train as hard or as often as someone with a huge amount of free time. Some of us train for enjoyment as much as to be better prepared, so investing time in our training will not be as painful as it may be for the person who trains only to mitigate their risks.

Resources

Whether it is taking martial arts classes, heading to the range, or attending a class or seminar, training requires resources. To train we often need equipment or instruction, and that usually comes with a price tag. We can’t all financially afford to spend thousands of dollars a year to invest in our training. If you enjoy training, you’ll be far more likely to invest in classes and equipment. If you train because you need to or purely to mitigate risk, you might be less apt to spend so much.

Fitness

Some of us physically can’t train as hard as others. I wouldn’t expect a 70-something year old grandmother to be be taking a carbine class and running around with her rifle. Some people have physical disabilities and still others are just out of shape. All of these factors can dampen the level to which we take our training. One exception that should not limit your training is fitness. If you are out of shape and enjoy being out of shape that might affect your training; otherwise it’s a matter of effort to fix that condition.

Interest

Finally, where you take your training is directly related to how interested you are. I’ve touched on this before, but ultimately all of these other factors can be almost ignored if you have the interest to train. There is no reason not to push yourself to a higher standard and to train more if it is something you enjoy. Sure you might hit the point of diminishing returns, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a worthy use of your time.

Not everyone can become a Delta Operator. Your level of training may be limited, but ultimately you decide how far you want to go. Identifying the reasons you want to train can help you decide what your goals will be and how to achieve them.

Why do you train and how does that affect your level of training?

Your Opponent Is Training Harder Than You

Need some motivation to go hit the gym, the mat, or the range? Well here it is: your opponent is training harder than you! This might not always be the case, but there is at least a slight chance that this is true. Do you really want to leave something like your life to chance?

Somewhere out there someone is better prepared than you are. They may just be stronger or faster, but they might even have a better developed skill set. These advantages your adversary has on you could be the difference between you that causes you to lose, or worse – die.

When you go train today, this week, or anytime for that matter, tell yourself:

My opponent is training harder than I am.

Fix it. Push yourself for one more rep on an exercise. Ultimately in most endeavors you need to push yourself harder. No one else can make you put in the effort that you need. Determine what your limit is, and try and push that limit every time you train. If you can’t raise the bar you most likely aren’t trying hard enough. All true gains come from within.

Making your training sessions more effective is just a piece of the puzzle. Not only is your opponent training harder than you, he is training more than you too.

My opponent is training more than I am.

Tell yourself that every morning. Use it as inspiration to find time to squeeze in another session each week. If you tell yourself that one hour of practice a week is enough then you are destined to fail. If you want to get good at something, you need to do it a lot. Train hard, but also train often. Get your lazy ass out of bed and do something.

Quantity doesn’t always beat quality, however. Your opponent is also probably training smarter than you are too.

My opponent is training smarter than I am.

Could it be true? Dedicate some amount of time each week to research training techniques, tactics and instructors. You need to go beyond just volume and continually try and improve how you train in order to maximize the results. Don’t get spastic about your training. Stick with what you are doing long enough to see results, or the absence of results. Without some consistency you cannot evaluate what is really working and what is a bunch of hype.

 

I hope I have inspired you not only to go train, but to go train harder, longer, and smarter than you are now. Don’t give up, and train like your life depends on it. Someday it might.

WP Like Button Plugin by Free WordPress Templates