What Would You Do With More Time To Train?

I’m not sure about you, but I find myself always wishing I had more time. All through college I thought I would finally find a little more of it when I got into the working world (I did a dual engineering major – perhaps I was a little sadistic). But now that I am there, I relish the memories of my college years when I had that occasional free moment.

Since I am always busy, my personal training is always a limited subset of what I would really like to do. I keep dreaming about what I would do if I got the chance, hoping that somewhere around the corner I’ll find a way to make it happen.

Grappling

One of the biggest weaknesses I know I have in my own skill set is grappling. I have some natural ability, but courses like ECQC tend to point out that I could use some real formal training in this area.

Adding some grappling – say some jujitsu or judo to my training schedule would be nice, but dedicating a minimum of 3-5 more hours a week to a regular commitment just isn’t in the cards with my current schedule.

Edged Weapons

Another area I have been interested in for years is edged weapons training. Knives are a common threat that can be very dangerous, but they are far easier than a gun to carry. I can’t remember the last time I went without a knife, but yesterday I couldn’t carry my gun. Being capable with a bladed weapon makes a lot of sense for this and many other reasons.

Finding formal knife training is a little more challenging than finding a good judo or jujitsu school. I haven’t had the time (noticing a theme?) to even look for knife fighting classes in the area, but I’m willing to bet I’d be spending some time driving to get to one.

More Shooting

If it hasn’t been obvious with the amount of content geared towards firearms training on this blog, I like to shoot. Right now, if I’m lucky, I might get two weekends in a row where I make it to the range. Other times I might get there (like last week) only to find no space on the range to shoot.

If I had a lot of free time, I would definitely invest some of it heading to the range. Pistol training on the range is best if I can make it at least once a week. I also would like to really start working carbine and general rifle skills more often.

Fitness

Right now I’m getting by fitness wise. Two to three days a week I do a short functional body weight strength training workout. I’m noticing small improvements, but spending less than an hour a week on fitness is pretty weak.

If I had more time, I would definitely spend some of it strength training. More time lifting, more body weight training, and some sandbag training to round myself out.

I would also love to spend some time on other areas of fitness like sprinting and some ruck sack marching/hiking. Both would do great things for my overall fitness and help round out some of my weaknesses.

Karate

I have been training in karate for a long time. It has been a passion of mine since childhood. For better or for worse, the past 8 years or so have been spent focused on teaching it. I love to teach, but of course when time is short something has to give, right? As a result my own training suffers.

Developing my own skills has dropped in priority compared to developing my students. I would definitely continue teaching regardless of my schedule, but being able to invest even a few more hours a week in my own training would be huge.

Odds are you are probably like me. You have some time to invest in training, but probably not enough. Day to day life takes a huge amount of our time. I’m always short on time, and I don’t even have kids yet: the ultimate time suck (or so I hear).

If you happen to have come into some free time to train, feel free to steal any or all of my ideas. Let me know what that elusive free time feels like. If not, then write a comment and tell me what you would do if you came into some more time to train. Maybe there is something else I need to add to my list.

Beginning Training Series: Hand to Hand and Traditional Martial Arts

Today I will be discussing fighting skills, specifically unarmed combat and traditional martial arts as part of my series on beginning training.

Fighting skills should be a major component of any self-defense training regimen. In order to truly be prepared for a violent confrontation, you need to be able to handle yourself with and without a weapon. We will discuss in the next post about how weapons fit into the picture, but today we are going to cover hand to hand fighting skills.

Striking or Grappling

When you break down all major martial arts systems that are intended for hand to hand combat, you essentially get two categories: striking and grappling. Some systems cross over that line more than others, but these are really the only two methods of empty-handed fighting.

Striking arts like Boxing, Karate, Taekwondo, and Muay Thai for example focus on using punches, kicks, and other strikes in order inflict damage to one’s opponent. The advantage to learning a striking art is being able to fight without becoming entangled with your opponent. On the street becoming entangled, especially on the ground, should be avoided whenever possible. Having one or both hands free improves your chances when fighting multiple adversaries. Unfortunately many real fights have a tendency to go to the ground.

Grappling arts like Jujitsu, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, and Wrestling focus on fighting an opponent primarily without the use of strikes. There is an advantage to learning how to grapple. If you end up in a fight, you are likely to find yourself in a scenario where grappling may be needed. Many street fights go to the ground, a bad place to be if your opponent has friends. Knowing how to grapple is your best bet to get out of these scenarios.

Think of it this way: if your only experience is with striking, you won’t know how to handle yourself if you get stuck in a grappling situation. On the other hand, if your only experience is with grappling, you are more likely to end up grappling (the very situation you should be trying to avoid).

Which should you learn? I recommend trying to practice both. If time only allows you to practice one, find a way to spend some time cross training the other. Every little bit helps in your efforts to be prepared to defend yourself.

Traditional Martial Arts

As time goes on, the “McDojo” fad has been driving people away from studying traditional martial arts. These dojos tend to overcharge and under-train, and they give many of the martial systems a bad name. Despite this, I would still consider traditional martial arts a valuable thing to study, and something you should seriously consider learning – if a decent instructor is available to you. If you find yourself looking for a school, check out my post about finding a good dojo.

When choosing a system, note that traditional martial arts have value that you tend to miss out on when studying the non-traditional systems. Many of the traditional systems put emphasis on training the basics and practicing kata (also known as forms). My experience is that this emphasis creates a well-rounded student. I have found that my time training in Kyokushin has made much of my non-traditional learning, and even my firearms training much simpler. In these traditional systems, you learn more than just how to punch and kick, but how to use the whole body in order to get the best economy of motion.

Finding a good martial arts school should be high on your priority list if you wish to improve your capacity for self-defense. Almost any system will do as long as the instructor is good. Having some formal martial education will significantly improve your skills and pave the way for learning new ones.

Have questions or advice about hand to hand martial arts? Post them in the comments!

WP Like Button Plugin by Free WordPress Templates