Do You Have Range ADD?

medium_3031432841Have you ever been to the range with more guns than you can carry in your arms in a single trip? Do you switch guns between strings of fire often? Do you shoot the same target for the whole range session or with multiple guns?

If so you might have Range ADD.

A few weeks ago, I went to the range with a friend and former coworker for some social shooting and to catch up. While we were there shooting on a common firing line with other members of his club, I noticed that everyone on the range appeared to have a case of what I consider range ADD.

Now maybe everyone was there for a social outing and only wanted to throw lead with their friends. If that is the case, that’s fine, I’m as much for enjoyment of second amendment rights as the next guy. You don’t need a rhyme or reason to be at the range shooting, and Americans enjoying their liberty is always a great thing.

That said, I’m also a huge proponent of making every round down range a learning experience. Ammo is too expensive and hard to find these days to throw down range with no return on investment. Even if I shoot firearms that I know I’ll never use to defend my life or home, I still make efforts to use the opportunity to practice fundamentals. Learning and improving on fundamentals requires consistent practice and feedback. Range ADD prohibits both feedback and consistency.

Three Ways You Can Avoid Range ADD

Bring Fewer Guns

The first symptom of range ADD is bringing too many guns. Do you need to only own one or two? Absolutely not! Owning more guns is never a bad thing. But you don’t need to bring them all every time you head to the range. I like to bring between 1 and 3 depending on my plan for the range trip. If I’m working on pistol skills and I feel like bringing more than one gun, I might bring my carry gun, a .22 pistol and a ‘fun’ pistol that might be part of my historical collection.

I would start with the carry gun to practice defensive skills before transitioning to the other pistols to continue working on marksmanship skills. I am still enjoying my “toys” while also making the trip a worthwhile training experience.

Plan Your Range Day

If you are heading to the range without a plan, you are almost guaranteed to get less out of your day than you would with a plan. Do you need your plan to detail how every round will be shot? No. But knowing which drills you plan on working on is a good start. Maybe you start every trip with a diagnostic drill and then choose drills to work on your weakest areas that day. Your plan can be flexible as long as it has some logic behind it.

Rotating through guns with every string or shooting at random is going to make it harder to improve on fundamentals.

Use Good Targets

No matter what you are shooting, make sure you change or paste targets frequently enough to get solid feedback, and use targets that help you learn. Shooting your target to swiss cheese with your entire collection makes it difficult to see where your shots went, and therefore removes the target from your feedback loop. If that’s your plan, why use a target at all? At least you might see where your hits land on the berm. If you don’t want to head down range as often, hang more targets, or use reactive targets like clay pigeons or steel. Feedback is necessary for improvement.

So do you have range ADD? Please share your opinions and experience in the comments below!

photo credit: dagnyg via photopin cc

Build A Training Support Structure You Can Be Proud Of

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What is a training support structure? Your training support structure is the combination of your peers and mentors that help you to progress in your training, maximizing benefits while hopefully minimizing costs. Your support structure might consist of instructors who you train with regularly or periodically, peers you discuss the ups and downs of your training with, and your training partners who help you push yourself past your limits and provide active resistance and pressure to your training.

Why You Need a Training Support Structure

Some disciplines directly require support. Jiu-jitsu or wrestling for example are very dependent on training partners. Sure you could learn something in a book or on a DVD, but without a breathing opponent to help learn and test your new skills, you are unlikely to progress very far.

Other disciplines such as shooting don’t necessarily require a training partner. You can head to the range and shoot without someone else, right? Sure you could shoot alone all the time, but friendly competition and another set of eyes can do wonders to help you get past a plateau in your training.

A further part of your support structure should be your mentors. Just about anyone can be your mentor, even your shooting buddy or peers in the dojo. That said, seeking out someone who has been or is at where you want to be can help you find your way faster than you might on your own.

What Makes A Strong Support Structure?

The best support structure is going to always consist of 3 things. One, your training partners need to be accessible. If you don’t ever train with your training partners, then they really aren’t your training partners. The same goes for your mentors.

Two, your training partners need to care at least as much as you do. Dragging a new shooter to the range with you is a great thing for the community, for you, and the new shooter;however, your new shooter probably isn’t as interested as you (yet!), and likely doesn’t have enough experience to be of much help as a mentor. You still often can learn as much teaching as you can doing, but keep in mind balance is required. You need time to work on your own skills.

A training partner who can also serve as a mentor is a great thing. Find someone who you know performs better than you in an area you want to improve. The opportunity to watch and ask questions can be invaluable, but if you are lucky they might even give you some pointers.

Finally, there needs to be trust and respect. A partner or mentor who puts you down instead of picking you up isn’t helpful. A mentor you can’t trust to give you good advice is unhelpful. And training partners who hurt you instead of help you in the dojo are a hindrance not a help. A good partner knows how to work with you, not against you.

How To Build or Find a Support Structure

If you want a support structure to help you maximize your training, you need to go look for or build one. Generally speaking they don’t come to you.

If you are learning a martial art, like BJJ for example, your school essentially provides a support structure for you, in the form of both mentoring and peer support. If you shoot on the other hand, you might have to work harder to find support. Local training groups can be a great place to start as are the competitive shooting sports.  These groups can provide you with plenty of peers and mentors.

Sometimes you don’t have access to ready-made groups. In those cases you need to make an effort and build your own. Attending classes and seminars can provide you the mentoring part of your support system. Some instructors on the traveling road show make recurring trips to an area. Being consistent with one instructor every year can help because they can see as you progress.

A great example of an instructor like this is Craig Douglas. Many people take his ECQC  every year as a way to brush up on and test their skills, and as a result Craig can provide continuing feedback year after year.

These classes can be a great starting point for finding your training partners as well. Network with your fellow participants. Often times they will be local and like minded, making them great training partners. Starting your own group can be a great way to build your own support structure and help others along the way.

Do you have a training support structure? What does it look like, and how did you find or build it?

photo credit: Craig Sunter *Click-64* via photopin cc

Do You Train Fight Avoidance Skills?

Photo Credit: danielcruz

Photo Credit: danielcruz

Recently Dann from the God, Gals, Guns, Grub Blog posted a comment on my post: Can Competition Really Get You Killed?:

 

Competition is good for developing certain skills, but as for preparation for real life… when the man says, “Shooter ready? … Stand by…” “BEEEEP”… and the shooter leaves his or her gun in the holster, turns and walks away from the stage therefore winning a gun fight by avoiding it… then, maybe we’ll be getting closer…

 

This comment really got me thinking… how many people really invest any time into fight avoidance skills? It isn’t really all that glamorous to practice talking and maneuvering your way out of a fight, but I would think that of any fighting-related skill, avoidance would be the one most likely to be exercised in real life.

I’m definitely all for training any pre-fight skills, but what about you? Furthermore, what classes, trainers, and methods work the best for training these skills? Please post a comment and share your opinion!

3 Tips For Building Continuity Between Training Sessions

Photo Credit:  christgr

Photo Credit: christgr

When training individually we often find things we can improve on. Slight adjustments to technique or perhaps better methods altogether may occur to you as you train. One key to maximizing your success in training is to make sure that these new ideas don’t get washed out with the tide every time you end your training session.

In dry-fire I might notice that I’m not picking up the front sight fast enough… and then make an effort to improve that. But if I forget about this effort, the next time I start dry-firing, I’m right back at square one.

Fortunately there are some tricks to help you keep your current focus points front and center.

Make use of your training notebook

If you use a training notebook, then half the job is done for you. As you make new discoveries in your training you should try to note them in the entry for that session. For example, you might note things like hand position during a reload or the discovery that you need to work on picking up the front sight sooner.

When it’s time to start the next session, go right back to the notes from your previous session. If you noted areas of difficulty or things you were working on, this is the perfect chance to make them conscious before starting back into your training.

If you end the session totally confident with this new skill or area for improvement you can note your success or just leave it out of the log. If you aren’t confident, however, note that too so you remember to keep working at it. Remember that the key to making this work is checking the last session’s log before starting.

Write your plan for the next session at the end of the current one

Oftentimes I finish a dry-fire session or even a day in the dojo knowing I wasn’t happy with some aspect of my performance. These are good days to do some pre-planning for the next session.

You can do the same, and write a plan for each training session. Don’t wait until right before the session to write this plan, instead make it part of your training routine. Write down the drills and plan of attack for your next session at the end of the current one. This way you can capture what needs work and where you want to focus next time.

Note cards or sticky notes on your gear

If you have trouble using a training notebook, or continually forget to open your notebook before starting, then get some sticky notes or note cards. You can write your plan or areas for improvement on these cards or sticky notes and stick them right to your training gear, whether that be a dry-fire pistol, empty mags for training, or your gym bag.

Placing these front and center will help keep your areas for improvement from falling out of focus.

The most important thing to remember about any of these ideas is that the key is keeping some continuity between sessions. Disjointed, spastic training tends to have less of a positive impact than coordinated effort.

These are a few methods for keeping continuity between training sessions. Now it’s your turn. How do you build from session to session?

Are Classes The Best Bang For Your Buck?

Photo by DrJimiGlide

Photo by DrJimiGlide

Over the past few years as I delve deeper and deeper into the world of training, I have noticed a pretty obvious trend: attending more classes does not necessarily mean more skill.

Despite this trend I can’t help but to notice how many people seem to hope for the converse. Time and time again I see well-intentioned students of the gun who are in the constant cycle of bouncing from class to class.

On one hand I must applaud these guys for doing what most gun owners don’t have the stones or smarts to do: get training. But on the other hand, I can’t help but to scratch my head when I see these guys fail to improve despite spending thousands on training from top tier instructors.

Classes Does Not Equal Improvement

Quite frankly most trainers can’t make you improve by all that much… at least not in a single day or weekend class. Instead a good class should give you the tools and techniques you need to improve yourself on your own time. Receiving instruction is never a replacement for old fashioned hard work.

When I compare myself to some of these “class junkies,” I can’t help but realize that with only a few classes under my belt, I tend to fare better when it comes to skills. On a good day, I can shoot the F.A.S.T. in 6-7 seconds, and when I shot the IDPA classifier a few weeks ago I was less than 4 seconds outside of SSP Expert (I really bombed stage 3). While neither of those are amazing feats, I find that there are a lot more people who can’t match that performance than there are people that can beat it.

Guess how many classes I went to in order to get to that skill level?

The grand total of my pistol training comes down to several 2 hour blocks taken at a tactical conference a few years ago, several Southnarc Courses (ECQC and VCAST) which contain very little actual shooting time and next to no work on the fundamentals, and the pistol work at the Larry Vickers course I took last year. And quite frankly none of those courses immediately offered huge bumps in improvement at my next range session.

Compare my abilities and quantity of training with some of these guys who go out to Front Sight every year or do multiple shooting classes a year, and you’ll find that the thousands they spend on training doesn’t offer any significant improvement over where I am. So why spend the money?

Money Better Spent On Ammo

Rather than drop $500-1000 a year on classes, spend that money on more ammo. Or even better yet, just dry-fire! Work up a training routine for yourself that includes dry-fire and live-fire, and keep at it. You’ll notice more improvement than you ever would just taking expensive classes.

When you do consider taking a class, keep in mind that a solid class has two purposes. The first is when you have no skill set at all. Learning to safely draw from the holster and learning good technique for running your gun is critical to get your training off to a good start. The second is when you have been at things a while and hit a plateau. If you can’t improve yourself, it’s time to have someone else help you. Let someone else look at your technique and offer alternatives.

Ultimately it takes consistent, focused dedication to the task at hand to improve. There are no easy answers or shortcuts, just effort and time.

What’s the ratio of classes to individual training that you use? Please post a comment!

Can Competition Really Get You Killed?

Photo Credit: Bob n Renee

Photo Credit: Bob n Renee

Last week there were a few posts out of Gun Nuts Media on the subject of competition. Both Caleb and Tim weighed in, giving their opinions on the matter. More specifically they discussed an idea that some trainers promote amongst their students: competition can or will get you killed on the street.

Both were very much in agreement with each other… competition will not in fact get you killed.

A counterpoint… sorta

While I am very much inclined to agree with these guys for a number of reasons, I do think the topic wasn’t 100% fleshed out.

You can argue that competition could, at least in a small way, get you killed in a street fight. The trainers who support this theory will often cite the fact that competition has specific rules that tend to favor some sort of gaming. Players always adapt to the rules of a game, and it is unlikely for those rules to perfectly mimic the real world.

Face it… if you focus on competition, some of the habits from that game will follow you into the real world. Not all of those habits will be good ones when viewed through the lens of a real life-or-death struggle. You might have a tendency to forget about follow through with a threat, you might shoot a certain number rounds instead of shooting to stop, or you might have any number of other competition-centric habits.

Tim also took BJJ as an example in his post, saying:

Have you ever noticed how no one ever says that competing in a BJJ tournament will get you killed on the street? That’s because it would be pitifully easy for an accomplished BJJ competitor to take the guy who said that and turn him into a pretzel in a matter of seconds. See, the Brazilian Ju-Jitsu competitor has had to learn grappling skills and has had to apply them at speed and at full force against someone else who is trying just as hard to do the exact same thing. He’s likely had his game plan trashed by circumstances and has had to figure out what to do when in a disadvantaged position. He’s sharpening his skills and his ability to manage stress using the crucible of competition…but replace BJJ with a handgun and everything changes? Nonsense.”

Well, let me be the first to say that competing in a BJJ tournament could get you killed on the street. BJJ, and especially competitive BJJ focuses on its own set of rules. These rules take the threat of weapons out of the picture… and not understanding how to prohibit the in-fight access of your adversary’s weapon could, at least in theory, end in your death.

I have spent enough time in classes like Southnarc’s ECQC to know that while BJJ skills often do create a huge advantage, someone like me with almost zero mat time can and will occasionally come out the victor over very experienced BJJ students and competitors. Competition could at least indirectly diminish your ability to survive a fight.

The whole truth

All of that said, I am still in the procompetition crowd. For all of the downsides, the huge upside is an excellent opportunity to test your skills under real pressure. Skills, especially shooting skills, have the unfortunate tendency to fall apart under pressure, and a lack of pressure testing means you will never know those weaknesses.

Furthermore, competition is a good way to inoculate yourself to that stress. If you can act and react calmly and coolly under the stress of a match or tournament, you have a much improved chance of doing the same under the stress of a life-or-death encounter.

Those trainers that say competition could get you killed are at least a little right. Many forms of competition tend to instill habits that won’t always be the best habits to have when things turn ugly.

The alternative, however, also has a chance of getting you killed.

It is easy to argue that anyone who puts forth the effort to become competitive in any sport that is at least partially congruent with real life fighting skills will have a lot more to bring to the table in a real fight. There have been a few stories about some stupid people trying to mug pro-MMA fighters only to get flattened… and I would definitely want to avoid a gun fight with the likes of David Sevigny, Robert Vogel, or Jerry Miculek.

Do you compete?

What about you? Do you compete or do you think competition might get you killed?

6 Signs Your Aren’t Maximizing Your Training Effectiveness

Does your training gear still look brand new?

When you train your goal should always be to train effectively. If every training session doesn’t get you closer to your goals, then you are really just wasting time, money, and your energy. Sometimes it can be difficult to really know how effective you are in your training. Below you will find a list of warning signs that suggest your training may be ineffective. How many of these apply to you?

The data in your training log shows no progress

In your training log or journal, you should always be seeing a trend of progress. Your shooting splits should be decreasing over time. Your max reps or weights should be going up, and scores in general should improve.

When you look at your log, you should be able to see this progress. Maybe not on the scale of each session or even each week, but over several months you should be getting better. If you are constantly gaining and losing again, you might want to consider redesigning your program to improve your consistency.

You don’t have a log

You do have a log right?

Not everyone believes in tracking progress, but I do. When you do see trends of growth and improvement you have the record of who, what, when, why, and how. Without it you can’t learn from your successes or your mistakes. And those long term trends are hard to see without it.

Furthermore, seeing improvement is a great motivator.

You haven’t checked your progress against your goals

Do you periodically check the data in your log against the goals you set at the beginning of the year?

If not you are missing out on an opportunity to directly measure how effective you are being. Having good, measurable goals means that you can easily see just how well you stack up to your plan.

Your equipment still looks shiny and new

If your equipment isn’t wearing out at least a little, or it is collecting dust, you probably aren’t training often or hard enough.

As an example the Glock 17 I use for most of my dry-fire and live fire training has some smooth shiny spots where the finish is starting to rub off, and the inside of the magwell is dinged up from thousands of repetitions of reloads. If the gun still looked new, you would probably say I wasn’t using it.

The same goes for any other training gear you have. Ever see an experienced black belt’s belt? The guys who train the hardest always have tattered belts after years of training… and it’s not from the washing machine…

You haven’t adjusted your plan

When you set out to achieve your goals, you make a training plan. Certain days get set aside for certain things and you plan out how you will achieve your goals.

As the saying goes: no plan survives contact with the enemy.

As you compare your results with your goals, you should be adjusting your plan. Some areas might not be getting the attention they need while other areas might be showing more progress and you can afford to redirect those efforts to your weak spots.

If you aren’t adjusting your plan regularly, you aren’t thinking critically about your training, and therefore are not maximizing your effectiveness.

Your plan hasn’t stayed the same for longer than a week

On the other hand, changing your plan too often can be your downfall. If you don’t give your plan at least a few weeks or months to prove itself, you are doing yourself a disservice.

No plan can really prove its effectiveness or lack thereof in a few days. Stay the course long enough to see if it works. Only when it has been given enough time to demonstrate how effective it is should you change your plan.

These are just a few signs you can watch for in your own training. Any of these can be an indicator that you aren’t maximizing your effectiveness in your training.

Do any of these warning signs sound familiar? Are there any other warning signs I missed? Post in the comments below.

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How Much Use Do Your Snap Caps Get?

My snap caps have seen hard use.

About a month ago, as I came back from the dead so to speak with my own training, I found my trusty training tools on the brink of their own demise. My snap caps are probably the most used tool in my training arsenal. They get used every day I dry fire, and they have seen thousands upon thousands of repetitions through my guns.

As I tried to clear one out of my Glock, I had some difficulty with extraction. Upon inspection I found that the snap cap rim was beginning to tear off. If I had owned these for a few days or weeks, I would say that the product was faulty. But after almost a year of daily dry-fire, these snap caps have held up great.

Best uses for snap caps

Using snap caps during dry-fire can be a great way to protect your firearms from unnecessary wear and tear caused by dropping the firing pin on an empty chamber. While this benefit alone is a great reason to use snap caps, I find that their value goes far further.

Malfunction Drills

Snap caps are excellent for malfunction drills. You can easily create double feed and misfire scenarios with your snap caps for practice clearing them.

When combined with live-fire, snap cap utility is fairly obvious. A snap cap can represent a misfired round. When randomly loaded into your magazines, they can create unexpected malfunctions.

In dry-fire sessions the snap caps can take the place of both the malfunction rounds and fresh ammo. When performing a malfunction clearing drill, always make sure a follow-up round gets chambered properly, validating your technique. Create double-feeds by placing a round in the chamber before easing the slide forward on a full magazine.

Reloading Drills

Snap caps are excellent additions to emergency reloading drills. Fresh magazines with snap caps allow you to ensure a round gets properly chambered. Dropping the slide too early during a reload can be a disaster, forcing you into an immediate action drill. Training with snap caps keeps you honest about the timing of your reloads and ensures you don’t drop that slide too soon.

How much use do your snap caps get?

I obviously use snap caps quite a bit in my own training, to the point where I would consider them disposable short-term-use items. Personally I keep a package of spares on hand for the next time the rim breaks off one of my snap caps.

How often do you use snap caps in your training, and what do you use them for?

Don’t already use snap caps? I use and highly recommend the snap caps from A-Zoom. Support small business and Indestructible Training by ordering yours from our friends at WTBGU. (Disclaimer: the preceding link is an affiliate link, and I will receive a commission for anything you buy through this link).

3 Steps To Make Your Training Work With a Volatile Schedule

Photo Credit: fabiennew

My schedule is almost always jam packed. Between the ”day job,” running my new dojo, serving on the BoD at my local fish and game club, and all of life’s other little surprises, there is almost always something I need to be doing.

Some of these demands on my time are constant. I know I’ll always be in the dojo certain nights and that most of the day I’ll be on site working for my clients. Working my training around these fixed obligations is relatively easy.

What’s more difficult is finding time when my schedule changes rapidly. A deadline approaches at work, an impromptu meeting, or maybe even just coming down with a cold all throw a wrench in the works. It’s dealing with an ever changing schedule that really makes consistent training hard.

Fitting your training in

In my situation I’m pretty much forced to find a way to make my training fit in around the rest of my life. I’ve found a few tricks that really help me, hopefully they can help you too.

Break your program into manageable chunks

If you have a tight schedule to work around, you should consider breaking your training program into smaller manageable chunks. Maybe 10 or 20 minutes each.

Breaking your program into small pieces provides two benefits: firstly, shorter sessions can easily be worked in and around your schedule. If your schedule changes, it is a lot easier to move a 20 minute workout around compared to a 2 hour mega workout.

You might even plan to do 3 of your mini sessions back to back under ideal circumstances – but when things change you can easily reorganize your schedule.

Organize your ‘chunks’ into your program

Once you have multiple sessions to draw from, you want to organize them to form a training program. For dry-fire training you might have 5 different dry-fire days, each of which consists of a different routine. Work your dry-fire days in order to ensure an appropriate balance regardless of whether you can do 10 sessions a week or 1.

Using multiple sessions like this means that when something unexpected comes up, it doesn’t destroy your program.

Pick optimal training days and times

My dry-fire days are usually Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, since those are the days I’m free of most of my evening obligations. As a result I tend to tentatively plan on working my dry-fire sessions in on those days. By keeping these evenings open for dry-fire I force myself to make a consistent effort to work on my goals. Don’t just assume that once you have broken your program into smaller chunks you will train when it strikes you as convenient. You still need a plan, but being flexible with that plan will help you stay on track.

This is how I work around my volatile schedule. Do you have a crazy work or travel schedule to work around? How do you handle it? Do me a favor and post a comment to share your strategies.

What Are Your Goals for 2013?

Photo Credit: Peter Kaminski

In case it wasn’t already obvious… this post is about a month late. Life got busy… Hopefully this is timeless content and you don’t mind the delay. Thank you for reading!

Well, it is here: 2013. A new year, and coming with it new challenges. Many people set out with New Year’s resolutions, goals and changes they intend to make to their lives. This is also a great time for reflection on the goals of the previous year.

Looking back at 2012

Looking back at 2012 I made a lot of training goals to go along with my ambitions to build this blog. Looking back now I’m actually happy that I didn’t publish a list of these goals, because honestly it is a little embarrassing how poorly I performed.

I only achieved a few goals, but worse than making progress and not meeting the mark is the large number of goals I set that I never even attempted to make progress on. I think this demonstrates a few things about setting goals.

  1. Too many goals can be a huge problem. In a previous post about setting goals, I pointed this out but failed to follow my own advice. 18 goals was way too many.

  2. I didn’t follow up or have intermediate goals. That means that it was easy to forget about the things not immediately on my radar. As a result I made no progress on them.

  3. For the goals I did make progress on, I fell short on almost all of them. I set goals that I thought were attainable, but honestly it seems like I set the bar too high.

New Philosophy for 2013

This brings me to the coming year. Obviously how I set my goals needs to change, both to make them more attainable and to make sure I have a proper plan in place to keep on top of these goals.

First, I’m going to limit the number of goals. I’ll follow my own advice and try for 7. That is much more reasonable than 18, and is basically the number of goals I actually worked on out of my 18 for 2012.

Second, I’m going to set intermediate milestones every 2 months, and set up reminders to check my progress against these milestones. If I fall behind in two months, I’ll have another kick in the ass to keep moving.

Third, I’m lowering the bar on my goals. Since most of these goals are almost exactly the same in nature to goals from 2012, I’ll use the amount of progress I made last year as a guide for setting my new goals.

Goals for 2013

To keep myself honest I’m even going to publish my goals as well as my intermediate milestones.

  1. Improve my 3 F.A.S.T. Avg (in a given range session) to be < 6 seconds

There isn’t much to say about this other than the fact that I’m scaling back from my goal of < 5 seconds for this year… and making the goal tracking more towards consistency. I want to be consistent as well as fast.

Milestones:

Feb Apr Jun Aug Oct Dec
< 7.0s < 6.8s < 6.6s < 6.4s < 6.2s < 6.0s
  1. Achieve a 50/50 Dot Torture at 6 yards

In 2012 my goal was a 50/50 at 5 yards, and I almost made it. I’m raising the bar a little since I have a whole year to go, but I want to achieve my goal this time.

Milestones:

Feb Apr Jun Aug Oct Dec
50/50 @ 5yds 46/50 @ 6yds 47/50 @ 6yds 48/50 @ 6yds 49/50 @ 6yds 50/50 @ 6yds
  1. Participate in 5 IDPA matches in 2013

Last year I made it to 2. I want to make sure I get to some more matches if for no other reason than to keep pressure testing my shooting skills.

Milestones:

Feb Apr Jun Aug Oct Dec
0 0 1 3 5 5
  1. Get classified in IDPA

I wanted to make it to IDPA Expert in 2012, but didn’t even get a chance to get classified. Instead my goal is to get classified this year, because quite frankly I need a point to measure from.

Milestones: N/A

  1. Study all Kata up to Sandan

One of my life goals in 2013 is to get my new NH dojo off the ground. I’ll be launching I launched the dojo in January and will hopefully get enough students to keep the doors open. As part of this goal I want to dedicate more of my life to regular karate training. A major piece of this is not only studying the Kata I know already, but to learn the new Kata that I should for my next grade.

Milestones: Rather than list the entire litany of Kyokushin Kata here I’ll generalize: I have picked a few for each milestone to focus on for each 2 month period. At a minimum I should be able to check off that I have spent the time or I haven’t up until I get to the ones I am starting to learn.

  1. Increase my one set max for pullups to 15

Improving my pullups was a major goal last year. I increased my total by a few, but fell well short of my goal of 25. This year I’m decreasing my goal to be only 4 or 5 above my usual one set max.

Milestones:

Feb Apr Jun Aug Oct Dec
10 11 12 13 14 15
  1. Increase my one set max for pushups to 40

I also spent a lot of time in 2012 working on improving my pushups. Now I do need to qualify that when I am talking about pushups, I am talking about knuckle pushups where my chest goes all the way to the floor. This full range of motion is much more difficult than the more common dinky pushups, and hence why the goal number is fairly low.

Milestones:

Feb Apr Jun Aug Oct Dec
20 24 28 32 36 40

What are your goals for 2013?

I’ve told you about my goals, but what are yours? Please post your goals in the comments below, or email me. If I get enough feedback I plan on putting together a post listing everyone’s goals for 2013 to hopefully help people in determining what kinds of goals they should make for 2013.

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